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Physician Scientist

About Me

Dr. Chad Weldy is a fellow physician in cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University. He received his M.D. from Duke University School of Medicine and completed his internal medicine internship and residency at Stanford University as a member of the Stanford Translational Investigator Program (TIP). Prior to entering medical school, Dr. Weldy received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington and completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the University of Washington, Division of Cardiology where he conducted basic science research investigations within the fields of cardiovascular biology, redox biology, toxicology, and epigenetics. Dr. Weldy has a clinical interest in the field of inherited cardiomyopathies where he treats patients and families within Stanford’s Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease (SCICD) with Dr. Euan Ashley. He will also be joining the lab of Dr. Thomas Quertermous where he will pursue research as a physician-scientist to better understand human genetics, epigenetics, and transcriptional regulation in cardiovascular disease.

His recent interview with Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship program director Dr. Josh Knowles on his experience at Stanford as an IM resident and CV medicine fellow can be watched here.

More information about the Stanford Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease can be found here.

Dr. Weldy and the Stanford Translational Investigator Program was featured in the 2018 Stanford Department of Medicine Annual Report and can be found here.

 

 

Genetics, epigenetics, and transcriptional regulation in cardiovascular disease

I am a physician scientist who has the opportunity to care for patients with cardiovascular disease with a particular emphasis on those with inherited cardiomyopathies. Scientifically, I am interested in understanding how genetics, epigenetics, and environment influence the onset of cardiovascular disease. I will join the lab of Dr. Tom Quertermous as a fellow in cardiovascular medicine investigating how variants in a gene associated with atherosclerosis influences smooth muscle transcriptional regulation and phenotypic modulation, a step crucial in the progression of coronary artery disease. In my fellowship research project with Dr. Quertermous, I will be investigating the role of PDGFD in mediating smooth muscle cell transition by mediating a transcriptional network through epigenetic mechanisms.

Curriculum vitae

Chad S. Weldy, M.D., Ph.D.

Contact

Email: weldyc@stanford.edu

Current Position

Fellow, Cardiovascular Medicine
Stanford University Hospitals, June 2019 – Present
Department of Medicine
Fellowship Program Director: Dr. Joshua Knowles, M.D., Ph.D.

Education and Previous Training

Internal Medicine Internship and Residency
Stanford University Hospitals, June 2017 – June 2019
Translational Investigator Program (Physician Scientist Training Program)
Department of Medicine
Residency Program Director: Dr. Ronald Witteles, M.D.
TIP Program Co-Directors: Drs. Joshua Knowles, M.D., Ph.D., Joy Wu, M.D., Ph.D., Vinicio de Jesus Perez, M.D.

Medical Doctorate (M.D.)
Duke University School of Medicine, August 2014 – May 2017
Advisory Dean: Delbert Wigfall, M.D.

Postdoctoral Fellowship, June 2012 – June 2014
NHLBI T32 Senior Fellow
Division of Cardiology
University of Washington School of Medicine
Research Advisor: Michael T. Chin, M.D. Ph.D.

Ph.D., Toxicology, September 2007 - June 2012
NIEHS T32 Predoctoral Fellow
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences,
University of Washington School of Public Health
Research Advisor: Terrance J. Kavanagh, Ph.D.

*Dissertation Title: Inhalation of Diesel Exhaust (DE) and its effects on inflammation and vascular function; investigating the role of oxidative stress and glutathione in DE-mediated effects

Visiting Scientist, April 2010 – July 2010, April 2011 – May 2011
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology
University of Heidelberg School of Medicine
Heidelberg, Germany
Research Advisor: Florian Bea, M.D., Ph.D., Michael R. Preusch, M.D., Ph.D.

B.S., Environmental Science (Environmental Toxicology);
Minor, Chemistry, June 2007
Huxley College of the Environment, Western Washington University
Advisor: Ruth Sofield (Harper), Ph.D.


Research Experience
Residency Research, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, September 2017 – current. Advisor: Dr. Sushma Reddy, M.D.

During internal medicine residency, I developed a project with Dr. Sushma Reddy (Pediatric Cardiology) investigating peripheral blood global microRNA expression profiles as a biomarker of progressive right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in adult patients with Tetralogy of Fallot. By utilizing microarray and RNAseq technologies in adult patients with TOF and varying degrees of RV dysfunction, our work led to the discovery that as RV failure progresses, peripheral blood miRNA expression dynamically changes and reflects the degree of RV dysfunction. Pathway analyses further suggest that dysregulated miRNA reflect changes in cell cycle progression and inflammation, potentially identifying unique mechanisms of disease in mediating RV failure in adults with TOF. This work has been submitted to 2019 AHA Scientific Sessions and a manuscript is currently in review.

Postdoctoral Fellowship, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Washington, June 2012 – June 2014. Fellowship advisor: Dr. Michael T. Chin, M.D., Ph.D.

During my postdoctoral fellowship, I worked under Dr. Michael T. Chin within the UW Division of Cardiology where I investigated the fetal origins of adult cardiovascular disease. My work led to the discovery that in utero and early life exposure to diesel exhaust air pollution increases adult susceptibility to heart failure in mice. By inducing heart failure in mice using the transverse aortic constriction model, we observed that mice exposed to diesel exhaust during in utero and early life development develop a pronounced dilated cardiomyopathy, systolic dysfunction, and extensive myocardial fibrosis that exceeds that found in control mice (Weldy et al. Particle and Fibre Toxicology, 2013). In addition, we have shown that in utero exposure to diesel exhaust directly impacts the placenta, promoting reduced placental weight and increased placental inflammation and vascular oxidative stress. We have found this effect on in utero development is sufficient to cause increased body weight, altered blood pressure, and increased susceptibility to heart failure in adult male offspring (Weldy et al. PloS One, 2014). We believe that air pollution alters placental function and embryonic development in a manner that confers epigenetic reprogramming that may determine one's risk of cardiovascular disease throughout life, and we have discovered that this in utero exposure can lead to DNA methylation changes in specific genes, including Mir133a2 (Goodson and Weldy, FASEB J, 2017). We are utilizing next generation bisulfite sequencing to investigate the DNA methylome to further investigate potential epigenetic determinants of this hypersensitivity. As I believe these environmental exposures have developmental effects that program our adult susceptibility to disease, it is my goal to understand what fetal programming occurs, determine if there may be markers of this programming, and develop clinical therapeutics that would allow intervention prior to disease onset.


PhD, Program in Toxicology, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, University of Washington, June 2007 – June 2012, Graduate Research Assistant. Advisor: Dr. Terrance Kavanagh, Ph.D.

In my Ph.D. work, I joined the lab of Dr. Terrance J. Kavanagh to investigate the role of oxidative stress and biosynthesis of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) in mediating vascular function and pulmonary inflammation in response to toxic injury. Our work led to mechanistic discoveries that help us understand how GSH mediates vascular reactivity and nitric oxide bioavailability and how injury from inhalation of air pollution can elicit systemic vascular effects. My dissertation identified key interactions between macrophages and vascular endothelium following diesel exhaust (DE) particulate exposure (Weldy et al., Toxicology in Vitro, 2011), discovered that heterozygosity in a GSH synthesis gene increases susceptibility to DE-induced lung inflammation (Weldy et al., Inhalation Toxicology, 2011), delineated the role for GSH in mediating vascular reactivity and nitric oxide production (Weldy et al., Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 2012), and further identified the gene-environment interaction between GSH synthesis and DE exposure on vascular function (Weldy et al., Inhalation Toxicology, 2013). As air pollution and exposure to fine ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) is a major cause of cardiovascular disease worldwide, these investigations have led to our better basic understanding of particle toxicology and the role of oxidative stress and the genetic determinants of antioxidant synthesis in mediating vascular function in response to injury.

Visiting Scientist, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Heidelberg, Germany, March 2010 – July 2010, March 2011-April 2011, Research Advisors: Prof. Dr. med Florian Bea, Dr. med Michael Preusch

During my 3rd year at UW, I moved to Heidelberg, Germany for a total of 6 months to pursue research on pulmonary hypertension (PAH). Under the guidance of Drs. Michael Preusch and Florian Bea within the department of internal medicine, we observed that the inflammatory cytokine Oncostatin M (OSM) is elevated in certain female patients with PAH, but not in those with dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathies. I continued this investigation by comparing important clinical markers determined by right heart catheterization and echocardiography to plasma OSM concentrations. We observed that elevated plasma OSM was associated with increased pulmonary arterial pressure, but also associated with an increase in 6 minute walking test performance, suggesting that OSM plays a causal role in pulmonary arterial remodeling, potentially allowing for adaptation under high pressure. I continued investigating the potential mechanisms behind this observation through in vitro techniques, where we discovered that OSM rapidly increases early growth response protein 1 (Egr1), an important transcription factor in extracellular matrix formation and cell migration. Although it is not known if OSM in these PAH patients provides a beneficial or deleterious effect to their disease, our work provides insight into the potential therapeutic potential behind altering OSM activity. This work was presented as an oral presentation at the 2011 American Heart Association meeting in Orlando, Fl. and a manuscript is currently being prepared for publication.

Publications

1. Goodson, J.M., Weldy, C.S., MacDonald, J.W., Liu, Y, Bammler, T.K., Chien, W-M and Chin, M.T. (2017). In utero exposure to diesel exhaust particulates is associated with an altered cardiac transcriptional response to transverse aortic constriction and altered DNA methylation. The FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 2017:fj.201700032R.

2. Liu, Y., Weldy, C. S., & Chin, M. T. (2016). Neonatal Diesel Exhaust Particulate Exposure Does Not Predispose Mice to Adult Cardiac Hypertrophy or Heart Failure. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13(12), 1178. http://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13121178

3. Hartman, M. E., Liu, Y., Zhu, W.-Z., Chien, W.-M., Weldy, C. S., Fishman, G. I., et al. (2014). Myocardial deletion of transcription factor CHF1/Hey2 results in altered myocyte action potential and mild conduction system expansion but does not alter conduction system function or promote spontaneous arrhythmias. The FASEB Journal : Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, 28(7), 3007–3015. http://doi.org/10.1096/fj.14-251728

4. Weldy, C. S., Liu, Y., Liggitt, H. D., & Chin, M. T. (2014). In Utero Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Air Pollution Promotes Adverse Intrauterine Conditions, Resulting in Weight Gain, Altered Blood Pressure, and Increased Susceptibility to Heart Failure in Adult Mice. PloS One, 9(2), e88582. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0088582

5. Weldy, C. S., Liu, Y., Chang, Y.-C., Medvedev, I. O., Fox, J. R., Larson, T. V., et al. (2013). In utero and early life exposure to diesel exhaust air pollution increases adult susceptibility to heart failure in mice. Particle and Fibre Toxicology, 10(1), 59. http://doi.org/10.1186/1743-8977-10-59 *Society of Toxicology, Inhalation and Respiratory Specialty Section, 2014 National Paper of the Year Award

6. Liu, Y., Chien, W.-M., Medvedev, I. O., Weldy, C. S., Luchtel, D. L., Rosenfeld, M. E., & Chin, M. T. (2013). Inhalation of diesel exhaust does not exacerbate cardiac hypertrophy or heart failure in two mouse models of cardiac hypertrophy. Particle and Fibre Toxicology, 10(1), 49. http://doi.org/10.1186/1743-8977-10-49

7. Weldy, C. S., Luttrell, I. P., White, C. C., Morgan-Stevenson, V., Cox, D. P., Carosino, C. M., et al. (2013). Glutathione (GSH) and the GSH synthesis gene Gclm modulate plasma redox and vascular responses to acute diesel exhaust inhalation in mice. Inhalation Toxicology, 25(8), 444–454. http://doi.org/10.3109/08958378.2013.801004

8. McConnachie, L. A., Botta, D., White, C. C., Weldy, C. S., Wilkerson, H.-W., Yu, J., et al. (2013). The Glutathione Synthesis Gene Gclm Modulates Amphiphilic Polymer-Coated CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Induced Lung Inflammation in Mice. PloS One, 8(5), e64165. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0064165

9. Weldy, C. S., Luttrell, I. P., White, C. C., Morgan-Stevenson, V., Bammler, T. K., Beyer, R. P., et al. (2012). Glutathione (GSH) and the GSH synthesis gene Gclm modulate vascular reactivity in mice. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 53(6), 1264–1278. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2012.07.006

10. Weldy, C. S., White, C. C., Wilkerson, H.-W., Larson, T. V., Stewart, J. A., Gill, S. E., et al. (2011). Heterozygosity in the glutathione synthesis gene Gclm increases sensitivity to diesel exhaust particulate induced lung inflammation in mice. Inhalation Toxicology, 23(12), 724–735. http://doi.org/10.3109/08958378.2011.608095

11. Weldy, C. S., Wilkerson, H.-W., Larson, T. V., Stewart, J. A., & Kavanagh, T. J. (2011). DIESEL particulate exposed macrophages alter endothelial cell expression of eNOS, iNOS, MCP1, and glutathione synthesis genes. Toxicology in Vitro : an International Journal Published in Association with BIBRA, 25(8), 2064–2073. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2011.08.008

12. Weldy, C. S., & Huesemann, M. H. (2007). Lipid Production by Dunaliella salina in Batch Culture: Effects of Nitrogen Limitation and Light Intensity. Journal of Undergraduate Research, VII:115-122, 7.

 

Awards and Fellowships

AOA, Alpha Omega Alpha Medicine Honor Society, Stanford University School of Medicine, June, 2020.

Winner, 2019 Stanford Internal Medicine Residency Research Symposium Travel Award, for the abstract, “Changes in circulating whole genome miRNA expression implicate inflammation as a key mediator of RV failure in adults with tetralogy of Fallot”. April, 2019, Stanford, CA.

Winner, 2014 Society of Toxicology, Inhalation and Respiratory Specialty Section, Paper of the Year Award, for the publication, “In utero and early life exposure to diesel exhaust air pollution increases adult susceptibility to heart failure in mice”, Particle and Fibre Toxicology. March 24, 2014, Phoenix, AZ.

Winner, 2014 Society of Toxicology, Cardiovascular Toxicology Specialty Section, Postdoctoral Travel Award. March 25, 2014, Phoenix, AZ.

Pacific Northwest Association of Toxicologists, 1st Place Postdoctoral Presentation Award, Seattle, WA, September 2013. Abstract titled: – “In utero and early life exposure to diesel exhaust air pollution increases adult susceptibility to heart failure in mice”

Second Place, Postdoctoral Fellowship Poster Competition, UW Medicine, Department of Pathology Annual Retreat, 2013. Abstract titled: – “In utero and early life exposure to diesel exhaust air pollution increases adult susceptibility to heart failure in mice”

Recipient of the University of Washington Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health (CEEH) 2012 “Innovations in Research” Award.
• This award was given for my 2011 publication in the journal Inhalation Toxicology. This publication was selected out of more than 30 publications from the 2011-2012 funding year from CEEH for best representing and advancing the CEEH mission.

Senior Fellow on the T32 University of Washington School of Medicine, Experimental Pathology of Cardiovascular Disease Training Grant. NIH/NHLBI T32HL007312 September 2012 – September 2013.
• Funded by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), this is a competitive training grant that is directed by Dr. Steven Schwartz within the UW Department of Pathology.

Departmental nominee and one of four finalists selected for the University of Washington Graduate School Medal.
• Each PhD granting department across campus can nominate one PhD candidate for the UW GSM, where “This medal is given to recognize Ph.D. candidates whose academic expertise and social awareness are integrated in a way that demonstrates an exemplary commitment to the University and its larger community.”

Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine (SFRBM), Young Investigator Award (YIA); Atlanta, GA, November 2011.
• 15 YIA awards are given to recognize the best presentations and abstracts at the annual SFRBM meeting (roughly 200 abstracts eligible).

Pacific Northwest Association of Toxicologists, 2nd Place Student/Post Doc Oral Presentation Award; Bonneville, WA, October 2011.
• 8 student or postdoc presentations were given

Pacific Northwest Association of Toxicologists, 1st Place Student/Post Doc Oral Presentation Award; Corvallis, OR, October 2010.
• 9 student or postdoc presentations were given

Pacific Northwest Association of Toxicologists, 2nd Place Student/Post Doc Poster Presentation Award; Seattle, WA, September 2009.
• 16 student or postdoc posters were presented

Predoctoral fellow on the T32 University of Washington Environmental Pathology and Toxicology training grant. September 2008 – June 2012.
• Funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the UW offers limited fellowships to predoctoral students and postdoctoral researchers who are pursuing research in environmental pathology and toxicology.  This fellowship provides tuition and stipend for its fellows for up to 5 years. 

Professor Ming-Ho Yu Award; Outstanding Student in Environmental Toxicology 06-07. May 2007. Institute of Environmental Toxicology, Huxley College of the Environment.
• Given to the top student in environmental toxicology at Western Washington University, recognizing academic performance, research experience and potential to contribute to the field of environmental toxicology.

Honorable Mention. May 18, 2007 Sigma Xi Student Poster Session at Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA.
• Given to the student who created and presented a poster that demonstrates understanding and capability of a research topic, first place and honorable mention received invitation to Sigma Xi, The scientific research society.

Third Place, Student Oral Presenters. November 2006. Northwest International Section of the Air and Waste Management Association Annual Meeting, Victoria B.C. Canada.
• Given to the student who best presents his/her topic based on clarity, professionalism and scientific success; received $100 prize.  Received award among a field of graduate students and was the only undergraduate student who gave an oral presentation.

Travel Award, U.S. Department of Energy. Paid travel, hotel and conference fees for 4 days to attend American Association for the Advancement of Science, National Conference in San Francisco, CA, February 2007.
• Given to 20 selected interns of more than 600 participating DOE interns nationally, given based on quality and impact of research and research paper written from summer internship position.  The 20 selected had their papers published in the 2007 edition of the DOE’s Journal of Undergraduate Research.

First Place Team Member, Student Environmental Challenge Competition. November 2005. Northwest International Section of the Air and Waste Management Association Annual Meeting, Blaine, WA.
• Given to all the team members who developed the best solution to an environmental problem with regard to risk assessment, use of technology, financial funding, and ability to create and present a power point presentation at the conference in an environmental challenge; received one fourth share of $1500 prize.

President’s List. Fall 2004, Winter 2005. Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA.
• Given to students who maintained above a 3.9 GPA


Abstracts and Presentations


1. Chad S. Weldy, Saad Ali Syed, Dong-Qing Hu, Xuhuai Ji, Anne Taylor, Brittany Navarre, Sushma Reddy. Changes in circulating whole genome miRNA expression implicate cell cycle dysregulation as a key mediator of RV failure in adults with tetralogy of Fallot, Circulation. 2019;140:A11848, Scientific Sessions, American Heart Association, Philadelphia, PA, November 17, 2019.

2. Chad S. Weldy, Saad Ali Syed, Dong-Qing Hu, Xuhuai Ji, Anne Taylor, Brittany Navarre, Sushma Reddy. Changes in circulating whole genome miRNA expression implicate inflammation as a key mediator of RV failure in adults with tetralogy of Fallot, Stanford Internal Medicine Residency Research Symposium, April 30, 2019. *Travel Award Winner

3. Chad S. Weldy, Saad Ali Syed, Dong-Qing Hu, Xuhuai Ji, Anne Taylor, Brittany Navarre, Sushma Reddy. Changes in circulating whole genome miRNA expression implicate inflammation as a key mediator of RV failure in adults with tetralogy of Fallot, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Heart Center Research Day, Stanford University, March 11, 2019 *Invited Oral Presentation

4. Chad S. Weldy, Yonggang Liu, H. Denny Liggit, Theodor K. Bammler, James W. MacDonald, Federico M. Farin, Michael T. Chin. In utero exposure to diesel exhaust air pollution promotes adverse intrauterine conditions, resulting in weight gain, altered blood pressure, and increased susceptibility to heart failure in adult mice, Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting, Pheonix, AZ, March 2014. *Postdoctoral Travel Award

5. Chad S. Weldy, Ian P. Luttrell, Collin C. White, Timothy V. Larson, James A. Stewart, Kanchan Chitaley, Terrance J. Kavanagh. Glutathione (GSH) and the GSH Synthesis Gene Gclm Modulate Vascular Reactivity and Diesel Exhaust-Induced Perturbations in Mice, Gordon Research Conference for Oxygen Radicals, Ventura, CA., February 2012.

6. Chad S. Weldy, Ian P. Luttrell, Collin C. White, Timothy V. Larson, James A. Stewart, Kanchan Chitaley, Terrance J. Kavanagh. Glutathione (GSH) and the GSH Synthesis Gene Gclm Modulate Vascular Reactivity and Diesel Exhaust-Induced Perturbations in Mice, Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA., November 2011. *2011 SFRBM Young Investigator Award

7. Chad S. Weldy, Errol Wijelath, Michael E Rosenfeld, Erwin Blessing, Florian Bea, Arthur Filusch, Hugo A Katus, Michael Preusch. Oncostatin M is Elevated in the Plasma of Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, but Not Patients with Ischemic or Dilated Cardiomyopathies: Insight into Mechanisms In Vitro, American Heart Association, Scientific Sessions Annual Meeting, Oral Presentation, Orlando, FL., November 2011.

8. Chad S. Weldy, Ian P. Luttrell, Collin C. White, Timothy V. Larson, James A. Stewart, Kanchan Chitaley, Terrance J. Kavanagh. Glutathione (GSH) and the GSH Synthesis Gene Gclm Modulate Vascular Reactivity and Diesel Exhaust-Induced Perturbations in Mice, Pacific Northwest Association of Toxicologists Annual Meeting, Oral Presentation, Bonneville, WA, October 2011. *2nd Place Student/Post Doc oral presentation award

9. Chad S. Weldy, CC White, HW Wilkerson, S Gill, TJ Kavanagh, Modulation Of Glutathione Synthesis Gene Gclm is an Important Determinant of Pulmonary Inflammation Following Intranasal Instillation Of Diesel Exhaust Particulate, Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting, Washington D.C., March 2011.

10. Chad S. Weldy, Inhalation Of Diesel Exhaust (DE) and its Effects On Inflammation and Vascular Function; Investigating the Role of Oxidative Stress and Glutathione in DE-Mediated Effects, General Examination, Oral Presentation, University of Washington, December 2010.

11. Chad S. Weldy, Ian Luttrell, Vicki Morgan, Dave Cox, Timothy V. Larson, James A. Stewart, Francis Kim, Kanchan Chitaley, and Terrance J. Kavanagh, Acetylcholine-Stimulated Aortic Dilation is Impaired by Diesel Particulate Exposed Macrophages; Investigation of Susceptibility in Mice with Compromised Glutathione Synthesis, Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL, November 2010.

12. Chad S. Weldy, Ian Luttrell, Collin C. White, Sean E. Gill, William C. Parks, Kanchan Chitaley, Terrance J. Kavanagh, Diesel Exhaust Particulate (DEP)-Exposed Macrophages Impair Vascular Function in Aortic Rings; Investigation of the Role of Glutathione in Mediating DEP-Induced Inflammation, Pacific Northwest Association of Toxicologists Annual Meeting, Oral Presentation, Corvallis, OR, October 2010. *1st Place Student/Post Doc Oral Presentation Award

13. Chad S. Weldy, Ian Luttrel, Hui-wen Wilkerson, Timothy V. Larson, James A. Stewart, Kanchan Chitaley and Terrance J. Kavanagh, Diesel Particulate Exposed Macrophages Alter eNOS, iNOS, and Mcp1 Expression in Endothelial Cells and Impair Vascular Function, Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT, March 2010.

14. Chad S. Weldy, Collin C White, Tim V Larson, James A Stewart and Terrance J Kavanagh, Preliminary Results Investigating Gclm Modulation in Diesel Exhaust Particulate Mediated Lung Inflammation, Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT, March 2010.

15. Chad S. Weldy, Dave P Cox, Tim V Larson, James A Stewart, Hui-wen Wilkerson and Terrance J Kavanagh, Diesel Exhaust Particulate Alters Endothelial Cell NOS, Endothelin and Mcp1 Gene Expression in Two In Vitro Models Of Exposure, Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, November 2009.

16. Chad S. Weldy, Collin C White, Tim V Larson, James A Stewart and Terrance J Kavanagh, Preliminary Results Investigating Diesel Exhaust Particulate Mediated Lung Inflammation in Wild Type and Gclm-Heterozygous Mice, Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, November 2009.

17. Chad S. Weldy DP Cox, TV Larson, JA Stewart, HW Wilkerson and TJ Kavanagh. Diesel Exhaust Particulate Alters Endothelial Cell NOS, Endothelin and Mcp1 Gene Expression in Two In Vitro Models of Exposure. Pacific Northwest Association of Toxicologists, Seattle, WA, September 2009. *2nd Place Student Poster Presentation Award

18. Chad S. Weldy, CC White, TV Larson, JA Stewart and TJ Kavanagh. Preliminary Results Investigating Diesel Exhaust Particulate Mediated Lung Inflammation in Wild Type and Gclm-Heterozygous Mice. Pacific Northwest Association of Toxicologists, Seattle, WA, September 2009.

19. Chad S. Weldy, DP Cox, HW Wilkerson and TJ Kavanagh. Diesel Exhaust Particulate Exposure Affects Endothelin-1, eNOS, iNOS Expression in Mouse Lymph Node Endothelial Cells. Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting, Baltimore MD, March 2009.

20. Chad S. Weldy and Michael H. Huesemann, Lipid Production by Dunaliella salina in Batch Culture: Effects of Nitrogen Limitation and Light Intensity. Western Washington University Scholar’s Week, Sigma Xi Student Poster Competition. Bellingham, WA, May 18, 2007. *Honorable Mention Award for Student Poster Presentation

21. Chad S. Weldy and Michael H. Huesemann, The Production of Biodiesel by the Marine Microalgae Dunaliella salina. American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting. Student Poster Presentation, Environment and Ecology Section. San Francisco, CA, February 15-17, 2007.

22. Chad S. Weldy and Michael H. Huesemann, The Production of Biodeisel by the Marine Microalgae Dunaliella salina. The Pacific Northwest International Section of the Air and Waste Management Association Annual Meeting “Healthy Communities – Using Science-Based Solutions for Sustainability”. Oral Presentation, Renewable Energy Section, Victoria B.C. Canada, November 8-10, 2006. *3rd Place Student Oral Presentation Award

Invited Seminars/Presentations

Invited Seminar – “Fetal origins of disease: In utero exposure to air pollution and adult susceptibility to heart failure” Grand Rounds, Duke University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology. Durham, NC. August 21st, 2015. CME Credit.

Organizer and Discussion Moderator – “Physicians in Pharmaceutical Drug Development – Expert Panel” with panelists from GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Cempra Pharmaceuticals, and Duke Clinical Research Unit. Duke University School of Medicine, sponsored by Duke Medical School interest groups: Careers in Internal Medicine Interest Group and Careers in Global Health Interest Group. Durham, NC. June 23rd, 2015.

Invited Seminar – “Fetal origins of adult disease - How exposure to air pollution during in utero development may predispose to heart disease” University of Washington School of Medicine, South Lake Union Group Research Seminar Series. Seattle, WA. January 23rd, 2014.

Invited Seminar – “In utero and early life exposure to diesel exhaust air pollution increases adult susceptibility to heart failure in mice” Pacific Northwest Chapter of the Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA. September 20th, 2013.

Invited Seminar – “In utero and early life exposure to diesel exhaust air pollution increases adult susceptibility to heart failure in mice” University of Washington School of Medicine, South Lake Union Group Research Symposium. Seattle, WA. May 16th, 2013.

Panelist - “What are you willing to breathe? Coal terminal health impacts forum” and “Effects of Diesel Particulate Matter Pollution on Cardiovascular and Respiratory Health”. Bellingham, WA. December 14th, 2012.

Invited Seminar – “Biosynthesis of the antioxidant glutathione mediates vascular reactivity and influences nitric oxide”, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Cardiovascular Biology, Breakfast Club Seminar Series. Seattle, WA. October 2nd, 2012. http://slubio.blogspot.com/2012/09/breakfast-club-tue-oct-2-2012-chad-weldy.html

Invited Seminar – “Health Effects of Air Pollution and Fine Particulate Matter” PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center, Grand Rounds, Bellingham, WA. January 24th, 2012. CME Credit.

Invited Seminar – “Diesel Exhaust and Cardiovascular Health: How our genetics may influence our susceptibility to air pollutants” University of Washington School of Public Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Departmental Seminar. Seattle, WA. December 1st, 2011.

Invited Seminar – “Investigations in Diesel Exhaust-mediated effects in pulmonary inflammation and vascular reactivity; how our genes may increase our susceptibility to air pollutants” Western Washington University, Huxley College of the Environment “Speaker Series”, Bellingham, WA. November 4th, 2011.  *Seminar was videotaped by WWU and placed onto their youtube page, available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXEal4YJsOU

Invited Presentation – “The Production of Biodiesel by the Marine Microalgae Dunaliella salina” Western Washington University Board of Trustees, Bellingham, WA. I was asked to be one of 3 students to give an oral presentation to WWU’s board of trustees at one of their meetings, representing excellence on campus. Bellingham, WA. June 15th, 2007.

 

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